Sacramento

Chambers work in union for better services

WOODLAND -- In a joint effort to achieve greater urban development and investment, two Hispanic Chambers of Commerce have decided to join forces under one chamber.

Members of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Yolo County (HCCYC) and the North Valley Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (NVHCC) met last week to make the announcement at a popular restaurant, with political and community leaders who witnessed this new agreement that will greatly benefit Latino businesses in the Yolo, Yuba, Sutter and Colusa counties.

"This is definitely the pattern to follow in the future, the merging of two commercial entities, taking into consideration that the development and investment happens in a single region regardless of the resources and decisions in other cities or counties," said Adrián López, HCCYC's president.

López assured that this fusion happens at a moment when the region and state economies are in bad shape, which could be an answer to push the regional economy.

"There are many small businesses owners in the area who have been suffering the consequences of the crisis but the key to a solution lies on the collaboration between all members since that will give us the chance to promote these businesses at a regional level in other communities," López said.

The chamber's president pointed out that the main goal of this new model is to work with all areas of the community to improve the economy and quality of life.

So far, NVHCC has a total of 50 members, while HCCYC has 40.

"There are almost 100 businesses that will meet this goal together and will become stronger in providing and promoting a greater development, and will provide financial resources to our members so that they can better their businesses and make their products known in the area," said López.

On his part, Ángel Díaz, founder of NVHCC, said that this merger will allow the new organization to be strong enough to have an impact on the California legislature.

"Sacramento has already noticed the success that this kind of mergers get so political leaders have shown a great deal of interest in our model since we have shown results that benefit medium-size areas like ours," Díaz said.

He also added that in many parts of the state, there are chambers of commerce that are isolated and yield few benefits. "Those are the consequences of not joining together; the merger is the answer to the times we are living in."

Send e-mail to: mmartinez@vidaenelvalle.com

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